WHHM Conversation: Assessing the Value of Old and Rare Books

Tuesday, March 26, 1:30 PM
Woods Hole Public Library

Kenneth Gloss, proprietor of the internationally known Brattle Book Shop in Boston’s Downtown Crossing, will give a talk on the value of old and rare books on March 26, at Woods Hole Public Library (581 Woods Hole Road).  The event is co-sponsored by the Library and the Woods Hole Historical Museum. 

Ken Gloss (left)

Mr. Gloss, who is also a frequent guest appraiser on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow, will talk in part about the history of his bookshop, which goes back to circa 1825. He is a second-generation owner.

He will also show some of his favorite finds and describe some of the joys of the “hunt,” as well as explain what makes a book go up in value. He has many anecdotes to share as well as guidelines for what to look for when starting a collection. There will be also a question-and-answer session before the conclusion of his talk.

Following the talk and question-and-answer session, Mr. Gloss will give free verbal appraisals of all books that attendees have brought with them.

WHHM Conversation & Tour: The Wonders of Dr. Yale’s Workshop

Tuesday, April 30, at 12:30pm
Woods Hole Public Library
Tour of Yale Workshop immediately following

The Yale Workshop

Dr. Leroy Milton Yale Jr. (1841-1906) was born on Martha’s Vineyard and lived in New York City, but his summer home was in Quissett, where he created his fascinating workshop. This workshop now sits on the grounds of the Woods Hole Historical Museum. It was the place where he pursued his many hobbies, including photography, etching, woodworking, fly-tying, and writing. As part of Art Week, Woods Hole Historical Museum volunteer Laura Reckford will take us on a virtual and then a literal tour of the Workshop, pointing out some of the treasures from the Museum’s permanent collection and giving insight into one summer resident’s life in Quissett more than 100 years ago.

 

Model Boat Show 2019

The 12th biennial Woods Hole Historical Museum’s Model Boat Show will be held on Patriot’s Day Weekend, April 13 and 14, 2019. 

Admission covers all exhibits and activities over the two days of the show. Admission prices are $15 for an adult; $5 for ages 12 to 17 and for uniformed military; free for children under age 12. 

See the MBS Schedule here.
See a map of Woods Hole MBS events here.
Register to be MBS exhibitor here.

This two-day celebration of small ships is an opportunity to view exquisite workmanship and meet model boat craftsmen from all over New England and beyond. Some of the vessels are so small they can fit inside a light bulb, most are much larger, ranging from 12 in. to 12 ft. Most have fine detail. Some are stationary, exhibited inside; others go into the water. Some are powered only by the wind, yet steered by radio control.

The centerpiece of the event is a village-wide array of model boat displays, featuring watercraft of every description: extravagant yachts, sturdy tugs, imposing military vessels, elegant steam-powered boats and everything in between. There is also a lot of fun to be had outside, as the boat show features radio-controlled model boats racing on the harbor, plus model boat kits that kids can assemble and then launch in a kids’ pool. There is truly something for everyone!

Scheduled talks include:

  • Historical Milestones in Model Yachting
    Saturday, 11 AM-noon, John Stoudt, “Little Boat Builder” (PA) and president of the US Vintage Model Yacht Group
    — On the sport/hobby of model yachting over the years, since 1851: Various key venues, skippers, boats, techniques, developments and processes.

  • Designing a Model of the Down Easter, William H. Conner
    Saturday 1-2 PM, Rob Napier, restorer and researcher of historic vessels for museums including Boston MFA
    — On interpreting research materials and the thoughts and processes encountered in designing a model of the William H. Conner, a full-rigged merchant sailing ship, Maine-built in 1877. 

  • “Saint Columba’s Curragh: The challenge of modeling a leather boat”
    Sunday 11 AM-noon, James Norton, professor (Maine, retired) and maker of small, historic open boat models
    — On the challenges of making a 1/24 scale model of the 36-foot leather-covered curragh used by Saint Columba and his monks to travel in exile from Northern Ireland to the island of Iona in Scotland in 563 AD.

  • “New Underwater Vehicles developed in the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Deep Submergence Lab”
    Sunday, 1-2 PM, Molly Curran, mechanical engineer in the Deep Submergence Lab of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Consignment With Dockyard Sales at the Model Boat Show
“Dock Yard Sales” is the Model Boat Show’s nautical flea market, operating on a consignment basis during the two days of the show. For consignors, it is a great opportunity to sell your marine overflow items (in good condition, please).
More information here.

For more information about the Model Boat Show, call 508-548-7270 or email whmbshow@gmail.com.

The Woods Hole Historical Museum and The 2019 Model Boat Show are grateful to our community sponsors.

WHHM Conversation: Woods Hole Whaling, by Dr. Jim Hain

A Woods Hole Historical Museum Conversation about Whaling in Woods Hole
November 13th, 2018, 12:30 PM, Woods Hole Public Library

Candle House in Woods Hole in the early 1900s. Robert C. Hunt Jr. postcard collection, Falmouth Public Library.

The stone Candle House on Water Street, which now houses administrative offices for the Marine Biological Laboratory, is a reminder of a time 175 years ago when Woods Hole was home port for a number of whaling ships.  In “Woods Hole Whaling:  A National and Global Enterprise from a Small Village,” Dr. Jim Hain will present the history of whaling in Woods Hole.

 Today, ships and researchers from the village sail the oceans seeking knowledge directed to the conservation of whales.  In a past time, the ships and people sailed widely to harvest the whales.  As with Texas and Louisiana today, the raw materials then were brought to a refinery or manufactory―in this case, the Candle House in Woods Hole,  used for storing whale oil and manufacturing spermaceti candles.

 Dr. Hain has assembled details from logbooks, account books, narratives, photographs, videos, cemeteries, and the work of other authors to paint glimpses of Woods Hole, whaling voyages, and the whaling related products manufactured and sold from the village.

 Dr. Hain has worked at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Sea Education Association, and is currently affiliated with Associated Scientists at Woods Hole.  He has done research from Newfoundland to Brazil.  One of his current projects is studying and monitoring right whales and their calving in coastal waters of northeast Florida, where he works from December through April. 

 The conversation will be held at Woods Hole Public Library lower level meeting room and is free and open to the public.

Sixth Annual Oyster Talk and Tasting 2017

The Woods Hole Historical Museum held its annual Oyster Talk and Tasting on Friday, August 25. This combination of education, support for local food growers, and gustatory delight took place on the Museum grounds at 579 Woods Hole Road.

The first part of the evening was a talk by local oyster growers Pete Chase, Eric Matzen and Mary Murphy explaining how oysters are grown in this area and the results in the past year’s conditions. Pete could be considered one of the pioneers of modern oyster aquaculture in Falmouth, as he established his oyster growing operation in Gansett Cove, the first to wend the way through regulations and opinions. Now there are a host of people growing oysters in Falmouth, stretching from Waquoit to Megansett. Pete, Mary and Eric are part of a co-operative of growers known as “Sippewissett Oysters”. The cooperative sells its oysters through the Coonamessett Farm.

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Conversation: Fundamentals of Navigation. Thursday, July 20, 2017

Captain Virginia Land McGuire, Associate Professor of Nautical Science, Sea Education Association, will lead a talk about navigating using charts, compasses, quadrants, sextants, taffrail logs, lead lines and chip lines and other tools in the era of celestial navigation, dead reckoning and coastal piloting. The program will be held at the Woods Hole Public Library, lower level meeting room.

Thursday, July 20, 2017
12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Docents’ Training, June 2017

Docents’ training was held June 13 at the museum with informative presentations by our exhibit curators. Tom Chilton has once again used his design expertise on our shellfishing exhibit. Our navigation exhibit had several guest curators, including Steve Wagner, former Fisheries captain; Virginia Land, associate professor and captain at SEA; and Jennifer and Arthur Gaines, with Bob Grosch using his skills to mount and hang charts and naviational tools.

Navigating the Seas in the Age of Sail

Navigating the Seas in the Age of Sail, you will discover how Cape Cod fishermen travelled close to shore and far from land before the days of electronic devices.

The exhibit features reproductions and an original of large, century-old maritime charts from the archives of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
Other artifacts include navigation tools such as sextants, compasses, sounding lines, chronometers and log lines. Thanks to Steve Wagner, retired captain of NOAA’s RV Albatross IV and Delaware and current member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Tom Chilton, Bob Grosch, Debbie Scanlon for curating this exhibit, and to WHOI for their assistance.

A Conversation About Shellfishing

The next “Conversation” sponsored by the Woods Hole Historical Museum will be a historical look at shell-fishing in Falmouth. The Conversation is scheduled for Tuesday, May 24 at 1 PM in the meeting room in the lower level of the Woods Hole Public Library, 581 Woods Hole Road, adjacent to the Museum.

The speaker will be Matt Weeks, who comes to the subject with not only a lot of on-the-water knowledge, but also a deep curiosity and skill in searching historical documents. Matt was the fisheries technician for the Town of Falmouth for two years, and helped oversee the creation of oyster rafts in Little Pond, among other duties. Since then, he has moved on to become a self-employed shellfisherman, with an oyster grant just outside Waquoit Bay. He works that grant, and also participates in wild harvest.

He has found the time and energy to do serious research in the historical records in the Falmouth Historical Society archives and the Falmouth Public Library, gleaning information about shellfishing dating back to 1770s. He will talk about the results of that effort. Continue reading